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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
. this was a japanese soldier who elected to stay in the jungle after the war was over. the island of guam and he stayed there with another guy until 1960. he came out 15 years after the end of the war and went back to japan as a hero and had a movie made about him and all that. by a quirk of faith i happened to find his long-lost diary actually here in washington. i went to return it to him some years later and he came back to guam and i met him and gave him back his long-lost diary out it was a very emotional thing as you can imagine. >> you looked at prisoners from the allied side in the japanese. how were they treated differently and where they treated differently? >> yes they were treated very differently. the americans of course were treated very brutally, not much food comp and not much medicine, hard labor and a lot of physical beatings. and the japanese military training which thought it was disloyal to surrender. so these american p.o.w.s were considered not honorable men and they were treated that way. on the other hand of course the u.s. treated the japanese prisoners in accord with the gene
the counter. it can get doctors to prescribe things. i went and got medicine. electing a demint who cured but with the case of diarrhea in madrid. that the distinction if there ever was one. later on he was thinking me for this. the phone rang. it picked up a bit of sure this person is speaking spanish. i picked it up. it was a spanish press the minister . basically a persecute person. in fact, he was going to the conference the next day in into them. a committee he called there. he said amelya would like to come upstairs to treat peptic fall. a said, but you don't want to do this, but it wouldn't be a really think to do the things he's of a protestant minister. so if you would just treat him it would be -- he would be doing a very kind act. i will let him stay more than a minute he said okay. a tall the minister, clusters. he sees instead of in the small room in his appearance. and the minister, of course, being spanish, he hesitates for a moment. did he rushes across the room and gives him a giant the back with more and had never experienced before. on the forget the look. he's looking
states's role in overthrowing the democratically elected leader in iran in the early 1950s is still hotly debated, the significance of that. that history is reviewed aerv o the scenes of a new movie that just iewened which is actually quite good. what do you think as you look of time, the lasting implications of u.s. policy deof >> iran is very complicated which we all understand. the ku of the prime minister was ousted if that is the word in 53 and the shop was never out of office but was reinstalled and put back in power. it was originally thought of by the british because it turned all the avy into oil. but i do think the present situation, you can understand or one should understand little bit that the iranian country has been overrun all its life by alexander, it has been told what to do by the greeks, the russians, united states, the british, they want to have a place at the table and they would like to have a say in their own lives. they live in a community surrounded by arabs. they have never gotten along despite the fact they're all muslims, the iranians don't like the muslims --
was elected president and called and said congratulations for your pulitzer in history. i would love to talk to you about how to preserve historical materials and what you've noticed from the presidential libraries you for tin. and on that basis we have talked a good bit while he's been president to renew our acquaintance ship after a 20 year hiatus. c-span: have you had any discussions with him about his whole race initiative? >> guest: absolutely. yes, i have. c-span: what do you recommend to him? >> guest: i think this is a great thing. i personally think from the work that i've done that our racial dialogue in america, our discourse is far behind hour objective reality and where we are; that if you study this period and you see how parochial, how limited, how much violence, how on a custom a lot of white people were even meeting simply from a different denomination or a different section of the country, there's -- ads in the newspaper were divided not only by race, but by sex; "help wanted, female," and jobs were -- you know, for women, were secretaries and teachers. we left it up a whol
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)